history podcast

To See the Mongols 1: Giovanni Carpine Goes East

Giovanni da Pian del Carpine and Guyuk Khan.jpg

Giovanni Carpine starts off a new series and a new set of travellers in the surprisingly interconnected world of the 13th century. Over the next number of episodes, I'll be focussing on contacts between Latin Christian Europe and the Mongols, and the travellers who went one way or another in establishing those contacts. Up first, Carpine is sent east in 1245 to find the Mongols, learn everything he can about them, and deliver a letter from Pope Innocent IV. Thanks for listening!
 
PS. I would also like to clarify one point here (aside from some questionable pronunciation of Mongol names, I mean). Early in the episode, I say that the Mongol raiding parties reached as far west as Vienna. Actually, they went further west than that in Croatia.

(MP3)

If you like what you hear, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.

Sources:

  • Carpini, Giovanni. The Story of the Mongols: Whom we Call the Tartars, translated by Erik Hildinger. Branden Books, 1996.

  • The Mongol Mission: Narratives and Letters of the Franciscan Missionaries in Mongolia and China in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries, edited by Christopher Dawson. Sheed & Ward, 1955.

  • The Secret History of the Mongols, translated by Urgunge Onon. RoutledgeCurzon, 2001.

  • Jackson, Peter. The Mongols and the West: 1221-1410. Pearson Longman, 2005.

  • Jackson, Peter. "Medieval Christendom's Encounter with the Alien." In Travellers, Intellectuals, and the World Beyond Medieval Europe, edited by James Muldoon, 347-369. Routledge, 2016.

  • Marshall, Robert. Storm from the East: From Genghis Khan to Khubilai Khan. University of California Press, 1993.

  • Morgan, David. The Mongols. Blackwell, 1986.

  • Rachewiltz, Igor de. Papal Envoys to the Great Khans. Faber & Faber, 1971.


Thomas Dallam 7: A Concert for the Sultan

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Thomas Dallam's travels conclude, or at least the part of them that I'll be covering here. There will be comedic chaos on the trip up the Hellespont, awkward interactions with the local ambassador, one incredibly stressful musical performance, and the unwelcome rewards of a job well done. Hope you enjoy it!

(MP3)

If you like what you hear, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.

Sources for Dallam series:

  • Early Voyages and Travels in the Levant, edited by J. Theodore Bent. Hakluyt Society, 1893.

  • Andrews, Kenneth. Trade, Plunder, and Settlement. Cambridge University Press, 1984.

  • Brotton, Jerry. The Sultan and the Queen. Viking, 2016.

  • Dallam, Thomas. The Sultan's Organ: London to Constantinople in 1599 and Adventures on the Way, translated by John Mole. Fortune, 2012.

  • Finkel, Caroline. Osman's Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire. Basic Books, 2007.

  • Jardine, Lisa. “Gloriana Rules the Waves: or, the Advantage of Being Excommunicated (and a Woman).” Transactions of the Royal Historical Society No. 14 (2004): 209–22.

  • Jenkinson, Anthony, et al. Early Voyages and Travels to Russia and Persia. Hakluyt Society, 1886.

  • Maclean, Gerald. The Rise of Oriental Travel: English Visitors to the Ottoman Empire, 1580-1720. Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

  • Mayes, Stanley. An Organ for the Sultan. Putnam, 1956.

  • Pedani, Maria Pia. "Safiye's household and Venetian diplomacy." Turcica, no. 32 (2000): pp. 9–32.

  • Sanderson, John. The Travels of John Sanderson in the Levant 1584-1602, edited by Sir William Foster. Hakluyt Society, 1931.

  • Somerset, Anne. Elizabeth I. Anchor, 2010.

  • Vlami, Despina. Trading with the Ottomans: The Levant Company in the Middle East. I.B.Tauris, 2015.

  • Willan, Thomas Stuart. Studies in Elizabethan Foreign Trade. Manchester University Press, 1959.

  • Wood, Alfred C. A History of the Levant Company. Frank Cass & Co. Ltd, 2006.


Thomas Dallam 4: Edward Barton in Constantinople

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Edward Barton takes up residence in Constantinople, struggles with his unofficial position, navigates the death of a sultan, and eventually goes to war alongside the Ottomans against a Christian foe. And Thomas Dallam’s departure creeps closer.  Thanks for listening!

(MP3)

If you like what you hear, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here..

Sources for Dallam series:

  • Early Voyages and Travels in the Levant, edited by J. Theodore Bent. Hakluyt Society, 1893.
  • Andrews, Kenneth. Trade, Plunder, and Settlement. Cambridge University Press, 1984.
  • Brotton, Jerry. The Sultan and the Queen. Viking, 2016. 
  • Dallam, Thomas. The Sultan's Organ: London to Constantinople in 1599 and Adventures on the Way, translated by John Mole. Fortune, 2012.
  • Finkel, Caroline. Osman's Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire. Basic Books, 2007.
  • Jardine, Lisa. “Gloriana Rules the Waves: or, the Advantage of Being Excommunicated (and a Woman).” Transactions of the Royal Historical Society No. 14 (2004): 209–22.
  • Jenkinson, Anthony, et al. Early Voyages and Travels to Russia and Persia. Hakluyt Society, 1886.
  • Maclean, Gerald. The Rise of Oriental Travel: English Visitors to the Ottoman Empire, 1580-1720. Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
  • Mayes, Stanley. An Organ for the Sultan. Putnam, 1956.
  • Pedani, Maria Pia. "Safiye's household and Venetian diplomacy." Turcica, no. 32 (2000): pp. 9–32.
  • Sanderson, John. The Travels of John Sanderson in the Levant 1584-1602, edited by Sir William FosterHakluyt Society, 1931.
  • Somerset, Anne. Elizabeth I. Anchor, 2010.
  • Vlami, Despina. Trading with the Ottomans: The Levant Company in the Middle East. I.B.Tauris, 2015.
  • Willan, Thomas Stuart. Studies in Elizabethan Foreign Trade. Manchester University Press, 1959.
  • Wood, Alfred C. A History of the Levant Company. Frank Cass & Co. Ltd, 2006.

Thomas Dallam 3: England’s First Ambassador

1 Murad III.jpg

Elizabethan England's engagements with the Islamic world continue in this episode, this time taking us back to Constantinople with England's first ambassador there, William Harborne. There's piracy, palace intrigue, and Harborne's steadfast distaste for French and Venetian diplomats. Enjoy!

(MP3)

If you like what you hear, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here..

Sources for Dallam series:

  • Early Voyages and Travels in the Levant, edited by J. Theodore Bent. Hakluyt Society, 1893.
  • Andrews, Kenneth. Trade, Plunder, and Settlement. Cambridge University Press, 1984.
  • Brotton, Jerry. The Sultan and the Queen. Viking, 2016. 
  • Dallam, Thomas. The Sultan's Organ: London to Constantinople in 1599 and Adventures on the Way, translated by John Mole. Fortune, 2012.
  • Finkel, Caroline. Osman's Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire. Basic Books, 2007.
  • Jardine, Lisa. “Gloriana Rules the Waves: or, the Advantage of Being Excommunicated (and a Woman).” Transactions of the Royal Historical Society No. 14 (2004): 209–22.
  • Jenkinson, Anthony, et al. Early Voyages and Travels to Russia and Persia. Hakluyt Society, 1886.
  • Maclean, Gerald. The Rise of Oriental Travel: English Visitors to the Ottoman Empire, 1580-1720. Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
  • Mayes, Stanley. An Organ for the Sultan. Putnam, 1956.
  • Pedani, Maria Pia. "Safiye's household and Venetian diplomacy." Turcica, no. 32 (2000): pp. 9–32.
  • Sanderson, John. The Travels of John Sanderson in the Levant 1584-1602, edited by Sir William FosterHakluyt Society, 1931.
  • Somerset, Anne. Elizabeth I. Anchor, 2010.
  • Vlami, Despina. Trading with the Ottomans: The Levant Company in the Middle East. I.B.Tauris, 2015.
  • Willan, Thomas Stuart. Studies in Elizabethan Foreign Trade. Manchester University Press, 1959.
  • Wood, Alfred C. A History of the Levant Company. Frank Cass & Co. Ltd, 2006.

The Travels of Johann Schiltberger 3: Timur the Conqueror

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Episode 3 is here, and it follows Johann Schiltberger on his merry way, after the Battle of Angora and into the life of Timur, the limitlessly violent Turko-Mongol conqueror. There will be pyramids of heads, flaming camels, and elephants, poisoned-scimitar wielding elephants. Timur's story is actually fascinating in itself, and we'll also look at his imperial home, Samarkand, by way of a somewhat food obsessed Castilian knight. Enjoy!

(MP3)

If you like what you hear, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.


The Travels of Johann Schiltberger 2: The Battle of Angora/Ankara

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Today, we'll follow Johann Schiltberger's journey under Bayezid's control. There will be an escape attempt, epic battles, an epic snake battle, and some Ottoman history. I hope you like it. Thanks for listening everybody! Enjoy.

(MP3)

If you like what you hear, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.


The Travels of Johann Schiltberger 1: The Battle of Nicopolis

Schiltberger Battle of Nicopolis.jpg

We begin the travels of Johann Schiltberger, a 14th/15th century, Bavarian Marco Polo who left his home for the crusade against the Ottomans and didn't make it back for a long, long time. In the intervening 30 years, he travelled widely as a prisoner, first with the Ottoman Sultan, Bayezid, and then with Timur (aka Tamerlane) and those who succeeded him, reporting on the world and its monsters, miracles, and numerous battles.
 
Schiltberger lived a full life at a fascinating time in history. I'll be telling his story and discussing his times over the course of 4 episodes. With episode one, we'll take Schiltberger up to the Battle of Nicopolis and the first massive shift in his fortunes. Hope you enjoy it! 

(MP3)

If you like what you hear, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.